Thursday, April 23, 2015

WHO'S ON TOP: NONFICTION


TOP FIVE NONFICTION:

HARDCOVER:

  1. BILL O'REILLY'S LEGENDS AND LIES, by David Fisher
  2. DEAD WAKE, by Erik Larson
  3. THE RESIDENCE, by Kate Andersen Brower
  4. BEING MORTAL, by Atul Gawande
  5. A FINE ROMANCE, by Candice Bergen

SPOTLIGHT:

BILL O'REILLY'S LEGENDS AND LIES

David Fisher
The must-have companion to Bill O’Reilly’s documentary series Legends and Lies: The Real West, a fascinating, eye-opening look at the truth behind the western legends we all think we know

How did Davy Crockett save President Jackson’s life only to end up dying at the Alamo? Was the Lone Ranger based on a real lawman—and was he an African American? What amazing detective work led to the capture of Black Bart, the "gentleman bandit" and one of the west’s most famous stagecoach robbers? Did Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid really die in a hail of bullets in South America? Generations of Americans have grown up on TV shows, movies and books about these western icons. But what really happened in the Wild West? All the stories you think you know, and others that will astonish you, are here--some heroic, some brutal and bloody, all riveting. Included are the ten legends featured in Bill O’Reilly's Legends and Lies docuseries —from Kit Carson to Jesse James, Wild Bill Hickok to Doc Holliday-- accompanied by two bonus chapters on Daniel Boone and Buffalo Bill and Annie Oakley.

Frontier America was a place where instinct mattered more than education, and courage was necessary for survival. It was a place where luck made a difference and legends were made. Heavily illustrated with spectacular artwork that further brings this history to life, and told in fast-paced, immersive narrative, Legends and Lies is an irresistible, adventure-packed ride back into one of the most storied era of our nation’s rich history.

PAPERBACK:

  1. AMERICAN SNIPER, by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice
  2. THE BOYS IN THE BOAT, by Daniel James Brown
  3. DAVID AND GOLIATH, by Malcolm Gladwell
  4. WILD, by Cheryl Strayed
  5. UNBROKEN, by Laura Hillenbrand

SPOTLIGHT:

AMERICAN SNIPER

 Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice
From 1999 to 2009, U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle recorded the most career sniper kills in United States military history. The Pentagon has officially confirmed more than 150 of Kyle's kills (the previous American record was 109), but it has declined to verify the astonishing total number for this book. Iraqi insurgents feared Kyle so much they named him al-Shaitan (“the devil”) and placed a bounty on his head. Kyle earned legendary status among his fellow SEALs, Marines, and U.S. Army soldiers, whom he protected with deadly accuracy from rooftops and stealth positions. Gripping and unforgettable, Kyle’s masterful account of his extraordinary battlefield experiences ranks as one of the great war memoirs of all time.

A native Texan who learned to shoot on childhood hunting trips with his father, Kyle was a champion saddle-bronc rider prior to joining the Navy. After 9/11, he was thrust onto the front lines of the War on Terror, and soon found his calling as a world-class sniper who performed best under fire. He recorded a personal-record 2,100-yard kill shot outside Baghdad; in Fallujah, Kyle braved heavy fire to rescue a group of Marines trapped on a street; in Ramadi, he stared down insurgents with his pistol in close combat. Kyle talks honestly about the pain of war—of twice being shot and experiencing the tragic deaths of two close friends.

American Sniper also honors Kyles fellow warriors, who raised hell on and off the battlefield. And in moving first-person accounts throughout, Kyles wife, Taya, speaks openly about the strains of war on their marriage and children, as well as on Chris.

Adrenaline-charged and deeply personal, American Sniper is a thrilling eyewitness account of war that only one man could tell.


E-BOOK:

  1. THE RESIDENCE, by Kate Andersen Brower
  2. DEAD WAKE, by Erik Larson
  3. BEYOND BELIEF, by Jenna Miscavige Hill with Lisa Pulitzer
  4. LOOK ME IN THE EYE, by John Elder Robison
  5. THE BOYS IN THE BOAT, by Daniel James Brown

SPOTLIGHT:

THE RESIDENCE

Kate Andersen Brower
A remarkable history with elements of both In the President’s Secret Service and The Butler, The Residence offers an intimate account of the service staff of the White House, from the Kennedys to the Obamas

America’s First Families are unknowable in many ways. No one has insight into their true character like the people who serve their meals and make their beds every day. Full of stories and details by turns dramatic, humorous, and heartwarming, The Residence reveals daily life in the White House as it is really lived through the voices of the maids, butlers, cooks, florists, doormen, engineers, and others who tend to the needs of the President and First Family.

These dedicated professionals maintain the six-floor mansion’s 132 rooms, 35 bathrooms, 28 fireplaces, three elevators, and eight staircases, and prepare everything from hors d’oeuvres for intimate gatherings to meals served at elaborate state dinners. Over the course of the day, they gather in the lower level’s basement kitchen to share stories, trade secrets, forge lifelong friendships, and sometimes even fall in love.

Combining incredible first-person anecdotes from extensive interviews with scores of White House staff members—many speaking for the first time—with archival research, Kate Andersen Brower tells their story. She reveals the intimacy between the First Family and the people who serve them, as well as tension that has shaken the staff over the decades. From the housekeeper and engineer who fell in love while serving President Reagan to Jackie Kennedy’s private moment of grief with a beloved staffer after her husband’s assassination to the tumultuous days surrounding President Nixon’s resignation and President Clinton’s impeachment battle, The Residence is full of surprising and moving details that illuminate day-to-day life at the White House.
 

Disclaimer: All information come from Nytimes.com and Goodreads.com.



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