Monday, October 15, 2012

From A Distance by Tamera Alexander

A Timber Ridge Reflections Book 1
Reviewed by Michala T.

Elizabeth Westbrook enters Timber Ridge, Colorado set on taking the perfect picture. One which will help her become an established photojournalist in Washington, D. C. However, Elizabeth is living in 1875, a time in which headstrong, career-minded women were not looked upon too kindly. Knowing this, she withholds telling the fine people of Timber Ridge just what exactly brings her to their small, quaint town.
Finally she finds the perfect scene and takes a picture. She knows this picture is the one. Moments before she can even ponder further into her future standings with her home newspaper she witnesses an event which causes her to lose all she has worked for. And Daniel Ranslett is all to blame.

Daniel offers to make good on a promise to help her find another scene worth capturing even though he doesn’t know that she needs the picture for her job. All he knows is the woman has a passion and a hobby for taking pictures. But Daniel is a gentleman and one who always honors his word.

When Elizabeth happens to take a picture of a scene that might hold the key to solving a murder, she puts herself in danger. Someone else knows that Daniel is always good for his word and requests he repay a debt which will take both Elizabeth and Daniel on a journey; a dangerous journey.

While battling the elements of nature as well as of those non-natures related, they find out just how much their lives are intertwined in ways they never would have imagined.

Although I am not passionate about historical novels, Alexander help my attention in this Christian genre colonial times novel. It was heart-felt and was hard for me to put down at times. The description of not only the inner workings of photography in the 1800’s but also of the ways people lived back then were hands down the best I’ve ever come across.

Alexander created a Elizabeth. She was a head-strong women but was made realistic in that she had her demons in the closet as well as weaknesses that she could do nothing about other. All the characters were well played and the dialog was sensational. Alexander definitely knew how to give the reader the perfect balance of description and conversation.

For the most part I would say this book was perfectly written. The only drawback I felt in the storyline was the threatening manner in which the lead characters were forced to take a journey. It was somewhat confusing exactly why it was so urgent to go on this journey. Perhaps if I were to read it a second time it would make clearer sense for me. Still the story, and the subplots, were excellent and well-crafted.

Overall Score: 7/10

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